020340700 info@ras.ac.th
DR. THOMAS GUY HAMILTON, PhD

DR. THOMAS GUY HAMILTON, PhD

HEAD OF SCHOOL

Dr. Thomas Hamilton is a United States citizen with twenty years of teaching experience. He has taught students from more than 40 countries, from primary to graduate level courses. His passion for education led him to study the teaching and learning of language and literacy in seven universities around the world before earning his Doctorate of Philosophy in Applied Linguistics.

Dr. Hamilton began his career in 1997 teaching youths in California while still studying to earn his teaching credentials in secondary education. In 2003 he was employed by the Thai Ministry of Education to train primary school teachers. A year later he became Assistant Director of a Thai Bilingual Primary School while also teaching first grade.

After being appointed to a lecturing position at the National Institute of Development Administration (NIDA) in 2009, he was then recruited to become the Director of the Language Center at the Asian Institute of Technology (AIT) where he worked for six years helping students prepare for higher education writing and research. After noticing the difficulty many Asian students had adjusting to Western style higher education, Dr. Hamilton decided to return to primary and secondary education with the hope of developing an international school where independent and creative thinking inspires our future leaders.

JEREMY SINSIMER

JEREMY SINSIMER

ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL OF OPERATIONS

Jeremy Sinsimer is a teacher from the United States and has been working in education for 8 years. Before arriving at Raffles American School as head of the ESL department, he was the Grade 4 level head at a prominent international school in Thailand for 3 years. He is passionate about teaching English to students who may have had difficulty acquiring a new language in the past. Mr. Jeremy also enjoys learning about new cultures, languages, and countries, and he can speak four languages in addition to his native English. Because he has spent so much time struggling to learn these other languages, he understands the difficulties non-native speakers can face when trying to understand English. Mr. Jeremy wants to create an inclusive and supportive learning environment for the ESL students. He hopes to build their confidence, teach them the value of mistakes, and inspire them to explore everything that the English speaking world has to offer.

 

DAVE LANKESTER

DAVE LANKESTER

HEAD OF UPPER ELEMENTARY

 

David Lankester is from the South West of England and has been teaching for eight years. After completing his degree, he moved to Thailand to begin his teaching career. After a few years of experience teaching in private schools, David was chosen to train new teachers for a major language school in Bangkok. This experience taught David the value of self and peer reflection when it came to planning and executing a good, engaging lessons. Next, David spent a year and a half managing a new and upcoming language school, but he decided that this position was not fulfilling his passion for teaching and so he decided to return to the classroom. David taught for a year in a prominent International School in Bangkok before making the move to Raffles American School. He is excited to have the opportunity to create a fun and interactive learning environment for his students.

kayci reyer

kayci reyer

HEAD OF MIDDLE SCHOOL

 

Kayci is a United States certified educator who has been teaching in public school for the last three years near New Orleans, Louisiana. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Political Science – International Relations from Tulane University in 2013, and later worked for the United States Forest Service in the mountains of Wyoming where she was responsible for visitor education. She enjoyed sharing knowledge and engaging others’ curiosity so much that she decided to become a professional educator. Kayci earned her teaching license in 2016 and has had the privilege of being in the classroom ever since. She believes providing individualized support, encouraging inquiry and analysis, and creating exciting student-centered lessons are critical elements to academic success.